I eat fairly healthy, I should have plenty of micronutrients…right?

 

Most people trying their best to achieve a “balanced diet” are falling short, creating personal deficiencies in vitamins, minerals, and more.

Between 1996 and 2005, 70 diets were computer analyzed from the menu of athletes or sedentary subjects seeking to improve the quality of micronutrient intake from food choices. The purpose of this study was to determine if food intake alone provided the Recommended Daily Allowances (RDA) requirements for 10 vitamins and 7 minerals. The ten vitamins analyzed were Vitamin A, Vitamin D, Vitamin E, Vitamin K, Vitamin B-1, Vitamin B-2, Vitamin B-3, Vitamin B-6, Vitamin B-12, and Folate. The seven minerals analyzed were Iodine, Potassium, Calcium, Magnesium, Phosphorus, Zinc, and Selenium.

The male food intake was RDA-deficient in 78 out of 170 micronutrient entries, or 45.8% of the 10 vitamins and 7 minerals analyzed.

The female dietary intake was RDA-deficient in 60 out of 170 micronutrients or 35.2% of the 10 vitamins and 7 minerals analyzed.

The nutrients most at risk for deficiency were:
• Iodine – 100% of the diets were deficient in iodine
• Vitamin D – 95% of the diets were deficient in vitamin D
• Zinc – 80% of the diets were deficient in zinc
• Vitamin E – 65% of the diets were deficient in vitamin E
• Calories – 50% of the diets were deficient in calories
• Calcium – 50% of the diets were deficient in calcium

With the prevalence of crash diets and dangerous food plans like strict keto being pushed by people without the proper training or education, more and more clients end up with severe nutritional deficiencies. Losing weight shouldn’t come at a price of risking general health. Not sure if you are nutrient deficient? Let’s chat and look at your daily food intake to see how you could improve your nutrient absorption.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/…/articl…/PMC2129155/figure/F1/
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/…/articles/PMC2129155/table/T2/