What Do You Think ALL Autoimmune Diseases Have In Common?

More and more people are being diagnosed with autoimmune diseases. These diseases can destroy healthy cells and cause abnormal organ growth and serious dysfunctions.

There are over 80 different autoimmune disorders. Some of the more common conditions include:

Multiple sclerosis (MS)

Addison’s disease

Celiac disease

Graves’ disease

Hashimoto’s thyroiditis

Pernicious anemia

Rheumatoid arthritis

Systemic lupus

Type 1 diabetes

Autoimmune diseases manifest with a wide variety of debilitating symptoms that can affect the blood vessels, connective tissue, endocrine glands, joints, muscles, red blood cells and skin.

For many of you that are suffering with autoimmune conditions, you already know that the body can fluctuate between remission and flare-ups. One day you’ll feel great and the next day you’ll feel as if you’ve been hit by a Mack truck!

Folks suffering with autoimmune conditions often have some similar complaints:

  • General fatigue
  • Chronic low-grade fever
  • Overall malaise (ill feeling)
  • Joint pain
  • Rashes

In modern medical medicine, there is no known cure for any autoimmune disorders. The medical protocol includes subduing the immune system to control the autoimmune response and to suppress the symptoms.

Dr. Mark Hyman warns, “Using anti-inflammatories like Advil, or steroids, or immune suppressants like methotrexate, or TNF alpha blockers like Enbrel can lead to intestinal bleeding, kidney failure, depression, psychosis, osteoporosis, muscle loss, diabetes, not to mention overwhelming infection and cancer.”[1]

Modern medical treatments for autoimmune conditions can create even more problems than the disease itself.

According to the U.S. National Library of Medicine, “An autoimmune disorder occurs when the body’s immune system attacks and destroys healthy body tissue by mistake.”[2]

I’m going to suggest that this attack is NOT a mistake. The body is designed perfectly. If the body is attacking itself there must be a valid reason for it. This is the ONE thing ALL autoimmune conditions have in common: the body’s immune system is attacking it’s own cells, organs and glands.

But why?

Why would the body attack healthy cells and try to destroy them as if they were foreign invaders?

The first thing to consider is that maybe those cells are not as “healthy” as we think.

Your food becomes your blood and your blood feeds and creates all of your cells. If your food is doused with pesticides, herbicides, fungicides and chemicals, those foods (and chemicals) are going to be absorbed by your body on a cellular level. That means those chemicals are becoming your blood and eventually will become your cells. Make no mistake about it, the chemicals sprayed onto our food supply are dangerous. They are considered a threat to the health and functioning of the human body, and yes, your immune system will attack cells made from those chemicals! It is NOT making a mistake.

Another aspect to consider is intestinal permeability, or Leaky Gut. The digestive system is a key component in dealing with autoimmune conditions. If the gut is not toned and healthy, tiny food particles can leak into the body without going through the proper digestive channels first. Once again, the immune system will attack those foreign particles. It is NOT making a mistake.

A third consideration could be that the digestive system and body as a whole, is overwhelmed with viruses and bacteria. Those pathogens are inhabiting your bodily tissues and affecting your health on a cellular level as well. It’s one of the reasons why I recommend specific anti-viral herbs and “de-bugging protocol.” You can read more about that here: Got Parasites?

There’s a LOT to consider when it comes to healing autoimmune conditions.

Here’s a recap of my top 3 things you can do to support your body and heal an autoimmune condition naturally:

  1. Eat Organic, Non-GMO, Naturally Raised Foods – always remember, “You are what you eat.” If your food is doused with dangerous chemicals, your blood and cells will become toxic particles, and your body will attack. Eat clean!
  2. Heal Your Gut! – If your digestive system is weak, leaky, and highly permeable, you’re setting yourself up for an all out war from your immune system. There are many ways to start healing your gut; drink bone stock, use astringent herbs to tone and tighten the intestines, and demulcent herbs to soothe inflammation. Glutamine and probiotics are another way to keep things working correctly. Plus incorporate stress-free eating behaviors so you can actually digest the food you are eating.
  3. Get the Bugs Out – Many folks with autoimmune conditions have underlying infections caused by excessive bacterial overgrowth, worms, viruses and other pathogens that make their way into your body and set up house. As these pathogens discover all of the great places they can thrive in your body (blood, bones, cells, glands, organs), your immune system will attack them.

It’s time to stop the suffering and start living again!

[1] http://drhyman.com/blog/2015/07/24/10-strategies-to-reverse-autoimmune-disease/

[2] https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/000816.htm

7 FOODS THAT REDUCE BLOATING

Bloating sucks. It makes you feel lethargic, unmotivated, it causes even stretchy pants to feel tight, and it can lead to an incredibly uncomfortable feeling for hours on end. Belly bloat can happen to everyone – it doesn’t matter if you’re crazy fit with abs. Your belly can still bloat. 

Luckily, bloating is one symptom everyone can do something about! For most people, it’s as simple as being mindful of what they eat.

But before we dive into the foods that reduce bloating, let’s first look at what causes your gut to rebel.

WHAT CAUSES BLOATING

Belly bloat is caused by many different things ranging from underlying health conditions and medications to the types of food you eat. However, some causes are more common than others.

For most people, belly bloat is caused by three main factors: dehydration, food intolerance, and hormone changes.

FOOD INTOLERANCE

The human body is interesting and no two people respond to food in the same way. Food that one person’s digestive tract breaks down without a problem can cause major bloating in another.

However, many people see issues with dairy, grains, and even salt intake. If you’re getting enough water, but still having major bloating issues, it could be time to look into your diet.

Don’t worry…we’ll go over some foods that reduce bloating in a bit.

DEHYDRATION 

Unfortunately, most people are in a state of constant dehydration. In our busy lives, it can be tough to make sure we drink enough water each day.

When you don’t drink enough water (half your body weight in ounces of water), your body starts holding on to the water already in your system. This causes your belly to bloat, but may also cause your joints to feel stiff, fingers to swell, and leave you feeling sluggish.

Luckily, there’s an easy way to check if you’re hydrated or not: the pee test. When you’re drinking enough water, your pee should be mostly clear. If you’re dehydrated, it’ll be dark yellow.

Next time you go to the bathroom, pay attention to what’s in the toilet bowl. If your pee is deep yellow, start drinking more water. You’ll probably see an improvement in your bloating too!

HORMONE CHANGES 

Yes, if it’s that time of the month, it’s completely normal to experience bloating. When your hormones go crazy right before your period, your body responds by creating gas.

For most women, hormone-caused bloating will end when their period does. However, if it doesn’t stop, you’ll need to evaluate what else could contribute to your belly bloat.

Yep. Some workouts can leave you feeling bloated, and you know why? It’s because of your breathing.

When you take in air quickly after getting your heart rate up, it’s not uncommon for those fast breaths to leave your stomach feeling full. This is because you’re also swallowing some of the air as you breathe in.

If you feel bloated while working out, try belching. It may sound gross, but you’ll feel better almost immediately. Don’t hold it in—it will just make you feel more uncomfortable during the workout.

FOODS THAT REDUCE BLOATING 

Believe it or not, eating the right foods can not only help reduce bloating quickly, but they can even keep you from bloating in the first place. Here are a few of the best foods to start incorporating into your diet.

APPLE CIDER VINEGAR 

Apple cider vinegar, more commonly shortened to ACV can work wonders for your gut. The vinegar helps soothe gastric upset by balancing the production of stomach acid in your gut.

Best of all, it boosts the good bacteria inside your digestive tract which helps your body break down all sorts of foods. The more you can digest completely, the less likely you are to feel bloated after eating.

YOGURT

Dairy may upset in some people, but yogurt can be a different story. Yogurt has tons of beneficial probiotics that can help promote a healthy gut and digestive system. These same cultures are found in dairy-free yogurts as well, so you can still reap the benefits if you’re lactose intolerant.

If you can’t handle dairy (or even if you can), I recommend taking a good quality probiotic every day!

BANANAS 

Potassium and sodium must be in balance in your body. 

Since bananas are naturally high in potassium, eating them on a regular basis can help give your body the resources it needs to reduce water retention and get rid of excess sodium from other foods.

Incorporate bananas into a smoothie for a delicious breakfast treat or grab one as a snack to help relieve bloat in the long-run.

CUCUMBER 

Since dehydration is one of the leading causes of bloat, it’s only natural that foods high in water content would help. Cucumbers are the perfect hydrating food to add to your diet without increasing sugar or your daily calories significantly.

Slice one up and eat it in a salad or add a few slices to your glass of water for a nice crisp taste. And don’t forget to keep drinking lots of water!

AVOCADOS 

Avocados are a wonderful source of healthy fat, but they also pack a punch when it comes to reducing the symptoms of bloat. Like bananas, avocados are naturally high in potassium and can help keep your gut happy when eaten regularly.

KIMCHI OR SAUERKRAUT 

Fermented foods help improve your gut health as they’re jam-packed with prebiotics designed to keep your gut bacteria happy and healthy.

Both kimchi and sauerkraut are traditionally fermented and full of many of the living cultures found in high-quality yogurt, but without the sugar. Both kimchi and sauerkraut make the perfect toppings for salads, but can also be enjoyed on their own.

The key here is making sure you purchase living kimchi or sauerkraut. If the label says that it’s been pasteurized, the beneficial living cultures will have been killed off before the food hit the shelves.

GINGER 

Sometimes, you need foods that reduce bloat quickly rather than foods that help prevent it over time. Ginger is one of the best.

This natural spice has been used for thousands of years to soothe upset stomachs and reduce bloating and inflammation in the gut. Make your own ginger tea for a fast-acting bloat-busting elixir. Even better, you’ll be better hydrated!

Microbiome in the Gut and Antibiotics

Does the Gut Microbiome Ever Fully Recover From Antibiotics?

Most gut bacteria recover quickly, but there can be long-lasting consequences from taking antibiotics.

Photo Credit Stuart Bradford

By Richard Klasco, M.D.

Q. What are the consequences of taking antibiotics on your gut microbiome? Does the gut ever fully recover?

A. Most gut bacteria recover quickly, but there can be long-lasting consequences from taking antibiotics. The changes, however, are not necessarily harmful.

The gut microbiome, the roughly 10 trillion to 100 trillion bacteria and other microorganisms that live in the digestive tract, contributes to healthby synthesizing vitamins, metabolizing drugs and fighting pathogens. Anything that disrupts the balance of microorganisms, such as antibiotics, which can kill both “good” and “bad” bacteria, has the potential to cause disease.

Data from a 2016 study suggest that exposure to antibiotics in infancy can alter the gut microbiome and weaken the immune response for years to come. Other studies have linked the use of antibiotics in children to an increased lifetime risk of asthma, obesity and inflammatory bowel disease, effects thought to be mediated by the gut microbiome.

Antibiotics can also have long-lasting effects on adults. Researchers at Stanford screened more than 900,000 genetic samples from the stool of healthy men and women who took the antibiotic ciprofloxacin. They found that most of the gut microbiome returned to normal after four weeks, but that the numbers of some bacteria still remained depressed six months later. In a longer, larger follow-up study, they concluded, “Antibiotic perturbation may cause a shift to an alternative stable state, the full consequences of which remain unknown.”

In an example of a potentially beneficial effect of altering the gut microbiome, evidence suggests that antibiotics can suppress the formation of a molecule in the gut that increases the risk for heart disease.

The National Institutes of Health Human Microbiome Project is using advanced genetic techniques to sequence all the genetic material of the gut microbiome. As newer data becomes available, a nuanced understanding is emerging: Antibiotics may exert both beneficial and harmful effects on the gut microbiome.